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Element Exposures

Exposure to nature’s elements is a natural, quick remedy for our mental and physical health. Here are few listed below to take advantage of right outside your home, or at one of our local nature areas!

1. Sunlight
A variety of our bodies’ functions are directly affected by sunlight. All of the wavelengths provided by sunlight that our bodies need, are not found in the electrical lighting used by individuals daily. This everyday contact with false lighting can eliminate our connection with the sun’s daily and seasonal cycles. The use of the sun to light the indoors has been proven to enhance school and workplace production. Sunshine exposure on the hands and face alone can lessen winter depression.
Numerous studies have discovered the direct importance of sunlight exposure. Consistent sunshine can improve heart health, muscle strength, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Melatonin production also increases through sunlight, along with the body’s feel good neurotransmitter, serotonin.

2. Dark nights
On the contrary, our bodies are prompted to fall asleep by the night’s darkness. Street, traffic and porch lights interfere with those indications to fall asleep. Discoveries have proved that if there is an abundance of light in the bedroom it will disrupt melatonin production and furthermore the sleep cycle. That disruption in the sleep cycle causes negative health effects similar to jet lag.
Today’s modern habit of texting or checking emails before bed throws off many sleep cycles. The electronic screens blue lights imitate sunshine, tricking our bodies’ natural sleep pattern, resulting in insomnia. Recommendations for those with sleeping problems, should use warm, red based light within two hours before bedtime, or set device settings to nighttime appropriate displays. These tricks prevent blue light from disrupting the circadian rhythms.

3. Greenery
Plant therapy is a field of psychology that studies the care provided for plants gives humans a sense of meaning joy. Our subconscious mind is triggered when we see lush, green plants. Patients who see greenery recovery more quickly in hospitals; and the presence of plants in windowless offices helps employees work more efficient and lowers blood pressure. Urban neighborhoods with an abundant amount of greenery atmospheres has helped foster social connections.

4. Sensory nourishment
Our bodies senses flourish on transforming and rich textures. Our eyes are working best when there are a variety of lighting levels in a room, because there is an abundance of color scales to explore visually. This causes a visual shift between near and far focus from time after time.
Our auditory nerves adapt best to quiet and variable background noises including the sound of a river, birds singing and wind in the trees. On the contrary, loud noises consisting of traffic, construction and monotonous sounds dull our energy.
Our olfactory nerve retrieves information about scents whether it be familiar or unfamiliar. Our sense of smell will warn us of danger such as smoke from a fire, or poisonous gases. Most importantly, taking a deep breath in a forest or in the mountains, provides a natural and relaxing sense of relief for mental health.
Take note of your senses where you spend time the most. Would it be possible to provide anything that can positively trigger the visual, auditory, or olfactory senses? On the other hand, take note of how you can minimize unflattering and monotonous sensory?

5. Water
Without a doubt, drinking water is vital for survival and overall health, however there are numerous methods water provides. Soaking in water or gazing at it is beneficial for our bodies, too. Studies prove that soaking in warm water balances the nervous system and reduces stress. Patients with anxiety disorders felt more at ease after 15 minutes of warm water immersion. A bath with chamomile and lavender oils can help ease your way into a good night’s sleep. For many athletes and active individuals, a warm Epsom salt bath can soothe overexerted muscles and joints.
Installations of ponds, fountains, or waterfalls provides a primal need of water in your views cape. Try for installations indoors at home and in the work space.

The Rossetti Family Launches Fundraising Campaign for Rossetti Memorial Pavilion at The Ridge Nature Area in Fayetteville

2014 was a very difficult year for the Rossetti family. The untimely death of V. Michael Rossetti, was shortly followed by the passing of Michael’s father, Vincent F. Rossetti. Both cherished and respected members of Fayette County, these significant and sudden losses were deeply felt by everyone who knew the Rossetti family. After careful planning, a fitting tribute to the legacy of these great men has been designed. The family is thrilled to announce the beginning of a community-led fundraising campaign for the Rossetti Memorial Pavilion at The Ridge Nature Area in Fayetteville.

“It is with a great sense of gratitude that we embark on this journey to memorialize Vince and Michael Rossetti.  Both of these men were genuinely dedicated to the Fayette County community. Through their involvement with The Optimist Club of Peachtree City, The YMCA, The Southern Conservation Trust, The Home Builders Association of Midwest Georgia, The Joseph Sams School, Fayette County Ducks Unlimited, their churches and the endless list of teams and schools they sponsored over the last 40 years, Vince and Michael touched the lives of thousands upon thousands of Fayette County residents. We hope to continue their legacy of providing shelter and comfort through these community funded pavilion.”

The first fundraising event for the Pavilion will be “Raise a Glass Raise a Roof” at the Georgia Shrimp Company in Peachtree City on Thursday, April 26th from 5pm – 7pm.

This campaign is a collaborative effort between the Rossetti Family, the Southern Conservation Trust and the Home Builders Association of Midwest Georgia (HBAMWG), the latter of which both Michael and Vince were past presidents. The site of the memorial will be located at The Ridge Nature Area, a city of Fayetteville public greenspace project that is managed and operated by Southern Conservation Trust.

The Ridge Nature Area is 308 acres of natural beauty and includes include biking and hiking trails, a primitive scout camp, and eventually the Rossetti Memorial Pavilion. Learn more about The Ridge Nature Area at https://sctlandtrust.org/work/the-ridge-nature-area/

Considering the lifelong passion Michael and Vince Rossetti held for their community, it is fitting that their memory should be celebrated in a place created both for and by their friends and family. Funds and materials for the creation of the Rossetti Picnic Pavilion will be donated. There are various levels of financial and material contribution, ranging from $20 to $10,000. All donations are fully tax deductible and every little bit helps.

“We, the Rossetti family, ask for your financial support of this Rossetti Memorial Pavilion project. We believe The Ridge Nature Area will continue the legacy of Vince and Michael by providing a place for families, civic groups and the community to gather flourish and thrive.”

Our family truly hopes that these community-funded pavilions will provide a calming, tranquil place for Fayette County residents to remember the Rossetti family and to reflect on their own legacy. You may make a contribution to the project by visiting Rossetti Memorial fundraising page here.  www.sctlandtrust.org/rossetti-memorial.

About the Southern Conservation Trust

The Southern Conservation Trust elevates nature through exceptional stewardship. Based in Fayette County, Georgia, the Southern Conservation Trust works throughout the Southeast and protects over 16,000 acres with six public nature areas and conservation easements. Learn more about how you can partner with the Southern Conservation Trust and protect your land at www.sctlandtrust.org.

 

16,300+ Acres Protected Throughout Georgia and Tennessee!

Fayette County Based Nonprofit

Now Protects Over 16,300 Acres in Georgia and Tennessee

 

Furthering conservation by achieving Guidestar Platinum Transparency

 

PEACHTREE CITY, Feb. 6, 2018 – The Southern Conservation Trust announces its largest increase in conserved land in the land trust’s 25-year history.  In early 2016, the Trust had just over 2,800 acres under conservation – with a primary focus on the southern crescent of Atlanta.  As of today, the Trust now protects over 16,300 acres across throughout Georgia and Tennessee, including multiple coastal wetlands in the Savannah area and river frontage on the Flint River.

 

“Building on the organization’s strong foundation, we have been able to significantly expand our reach in the past year,” said Katie Pace, who became SCT’s Executive Director in late 2016. “Conserving land and providing environmental education is the primary focus of the organization, and I am thrilled to have the chance to protect over 16,300 acres of resource valuable land across Georgia and Tennessee.”

 

In February 2018, the Southern Conservation Trust was awarded Guidestar’s Platinum Seal of Transparency. GuideStar is the world’s largest source of information on nonprofit organizations.

 

In 2018, the Southern Conservation Trust will offer additional environmental education opportunities to the community, including additional Camp WILD summer camps thanks to the addition of their new Director of Conservation and Outdoor Education, Nick Kilburg and Assistant Director of Development, Liz Hall-Dukin.

 

“Moving into 2018, we are poised to work with the local community to protect additional greenspace and rivers in high priority watersheds like the Flint River Basin, conserve beautiful farms, marshland and forests, protect at risk wildlife, all while providing environmental education in Fayette County,” said Pace. “We are looking forward to a year of growth and taking a deeper dive into the community as we plan for the proposed nature center at The Ridge Nature Area.”

 

About the Southern Conservation Trust

The Southern Conservation Trust protects greenspace, conserves forests, safeguards rivers, protects wildlife, provides environmental education, and ensures that our children have access to nature in our communities. Based in Fayette County, Georgia, the Southern Conservation Trust works throughout the Southeast and protects over 16,000 acres with six public nature areas and conservation easements. Learn more about how you can partner with the Southern Conservation Trust and protect your land at www.sctlandtrust.org.

 

The Ridge Turtle Project

The Southern Conservation Trust and Clayton State University have been working together to help the Eastern Box Turtles in Fayetteville, Georgia. So far, the box turtle population has been decreasing because of predators. Armadillos and people are the main predators for the box turtles. Armadillos eat turtle eggs. When the eggs are laid, there are pheromones that are released from the nests, enticing the armadillos.

Dennis Chase, Dr. Diane day from Clayton State, and myself have been monitoring the turtles at The Ridge Nature Area in Fayetteville. We have seventeen nests on one side of the creek and six on the other side. Hatching season is upon us, but, so far, there has not been much activity or hatchlings. We believe it is because of low rainfall so the dirt is too hard and compact for the baby turtles to crawl out of.

We are hoping there will be hatchlings soon because of the heavy rain that we just had. It takes about 70-100 days for the turtles to hatch, and a lot of the nests are nearing 75-80 days. Hopefully, there will be some hatchlings soon.

 

The photo to the left is a one-year old baby turtle from a late emerging nest from 2017.

This photo to the right is a female turtle that was hit by a lawn mower blade but she survived. The damage to her shell seems to have happened several years ago and could have kept her from growing. She is about eleven plus years old but she only weighs 254 grams. Female turtles at eleven years should be around 350 grams. She is also just over 10 cm, which is the average length of 6-7 year old turtles.

 

Continuing more with the turtles, The Ridge has a three-toed, olive colored box turtle roaming around the area. She had been there for some years and is estimated to be around 70+ years old, since her shell is so worn down.

 

From the photo on the right, she has three toes – three claws – which is completely normal for her species of box turtle.

We have a theory that someone had moved her from her original home (which may have been Texas, Missouri, or Louisiana. Three-toed box turtles are native in those areas) and brought her here, releasing her into The Ridge.

Dr. Day and Mr. Chase have found her several times before I joined the team. I did find her on one of the roads when I was entering The Ridge. We have not seen her since, though. But we do believe that she had laid some eggs and that one of the nests we have is her’s. If one of the nests are her’s, she might have mated with one of our four-toed turtles. There is a chance that we will have a mix of three-toed and four-toed box turtle babies.

We are very excited for the baby turtles and will keep everyone updated with the hatchlings.

 

 

Nicole Echols

Southern Conservation Trust Partners with Delta, EarthShare, and the Flint Riverkeeper on Wetland Project in Peachtree City

Over 65+ Delta employees and their families volunteered on April 1st, 2017. Over 65+ Delta employees and their families volunteered on April 1st, 2017.

 

PEACHTREE CITY, April 6, 2017 – If you happened upon Line Creek Nature Area in the heart of Peachtree City on Saturday, it’s likely that people were everywhere and parking was unavailable.  This effort was part of EarthShare Georgia’s Corporate Green Day Challenge in which more than 12 leading companies across Atlanta competed throughout the Atlanta area.

A Delta Employees Son Uses His Waders To Plant on the Duck Nesting Island

Delta Airlines partnered with the Southern Conservation Trust and the Flint Riverkeeper to complete the wetland project at Line Creek Nature Area that has been years in the making. The project, started with the City of Peachtree City and Trinity Development to put in place a sustainable wetland below the new Overlook Shopping center.

Thanks to more than 65 Delta employees and their families, as well as volunteers from the Fayette County Extension Office, the Fayette Butterfly Project, and the Fayette Master Gardeners the wetland is now nearly ready for its official grand opening coming later this spring.

Over 250 native pollinating plants went in, increasing the wetland habitat to promote wood duck nesting and the planting of a 20ft x 30ft butterfly garden, the first on the Fayette County Butterfly Trail.  It only took 4 hours for the team to accomplish all the planting as well as staining the new observation deck, fencing, and three bridges.  A local Girl Scout Troop was also on hand and dispersed more than 8 pounds of wildflower seeds at Line Creek Nature Area.  The group from Delta also came with a tractor in tow and used the generous gift of mulch from Monster Tree Service to add much needed mulch to the trails.

“When you look around and see people taking time out to serve their communities, you want to add to the momentum and show your appreciation by contributing,” said Delta TechOps Engineer, Jami Ference. “There’s a certain gratification from our work this weekend, knowing that we were not only helping the Southern Conservation Trust create the wetland park they envisioned but also making this a beautiful outdoor space for the public to enjoy.”

Delta employees brought there children, many of which were scouts to volunteer. Delta employees brought there children, many of which were scouts to volunteer.

For more information on the official grand opening of the Wetland at Line Creek Nature Area please follow the Southern Conservation Trust on Facebook and Instagram. All photographs were taken by Steve Tochilin, Delta General Manager of Environmental Sustainability.

About the Southern Conservation Trust

The Southern Conservation Trust protects greenspace, conserves forests, safeguards rivers, protects wildlife, provides environmental education, and ensures that our children have access to nature in our communities.  Learn more about how you can partner with the Southern Conservation Trust and protect your land at www.sctlandtrust.org.

 

A Delta Family Volunteers at Line Creek Nature Area

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Southern Conservation Trust to Partner with the Atlanta Food Initiative on The Orchard Project: Providing Fruit at Trail Heads

PEACHTREE CITY, March 8, 2017 – The Southern Conservation Trust is proud to announce their participation in The Orchard Project with the Atlanta Local Food Initiative.  The Orchard Project installs edible school and community orchards that aim to feed, teach, and inspire.

“The Atlanta Local Food Initiative Orchard Project is multifaceted,” said Robby Astrove, who leads planting for The Orchard Project. “Obviously there’s a component about food access and getting more local food in the community. But there’s also harnessing the power of the fruit tree, which is the most productive, longest living form of agriculture. Creating food for decades from one simple planting is pretty incredible.”

The Southern Conservation Trust is the only organization in the Southern Crescent of Atlanta to have been chosen as one of eight selected organizations and schools to receive fruit bearing plants.

“We are honored to be a part of such an incredible project that provides fruit to the community,” said Katie Pace, Executive Director of the Southern Conservation Trust. “Fruit bearing trees and plants at the trail heads will be a unique and fun way for the community to take something healthy on their hikes, while feeding the local wildlife at the same time.”

On March 21, 2017 from 10:00am – 2:00pm the Southern Conservation Trust invites the community to join us in planting fruit bearing trees from The Orchard Project at multiple trail heads at The Ridge Nature Area at the end of Burch Road in Fayetteville. Please bring gloves, shovels, and a bagged lunch.

About the Southern Conservation Trust

The Southern Conservation Trust protects greenspace, conserves forests, safeguards rivers, protects wildlife, provides environmental education, and ensures that our children have access to nature in our communities.  In 2016, the Trust also opened the premier greenspace project in Fayetteville, The Ridge Nature Area, making it its sixth public nature area in Fayette County. Learn more about how you can partner with the Southern Conservation Trust and protect your land at www.sctlandtrust.org.

About the Atlanta Regional Commission

The Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC) is the regional planning and intergovernmental coordination agency for the 10-county area including Cherokee, Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Douglas, Fayette, Fulton, Gwinnett, Henry and Rockdale counties, as well as the City of Atlanta. Learn more at www.atlantaregional.com.

 

Fayette County Based Nonprofit, the Southern Conservation Trust Conserves 3,600 Acres in December

PEACHTREE CITY, Feb 15, 2017 – The Southern Conservation Trust announces its largest increase in conserved land in the land trust’s 23-year history.  In August, the Trust had 2,800 acres under conservation – with a primary focus on the southern crescent of Atlanta.  As of Jan. 1, 2017 the Trust now holds conservation easements on 6,010 acres across the state of Georgia, including multiple coastal wetlands in the Savannah area.

“Building on the organization’s strong foundation, we have been able to significantly expand our reach in the past 90 days,” said Katie Pace, who became SCT’s Executive Director in August. “Conserving land is the primary focus of the organization, and I am thrilled to have the chance to conserve an additional 3,800 acres of resource valuable land across the great state of Georgia in December.”

Of the 3,600 acres conserved, 1,878 acres are historical marshlands on the Georgia coast that include multiple histortic trees on the Live Oak Registry, with the remaining acreage spread out among Henry, Hancock, Oglethorpe, Floyd, Dekalb, and Newton counties, providing much needed greenspace to communities throughout Georgia.

“Moving into 2017, we are poised to work with the local community to protect additional greenspace and rivers in high priority watersheds like the Flint River Basin, conserve beautiful farms, marshland and forests, protect at risk wildlife, all while providing environmental education in Fayette County,” said Pace. “We are looking forward to a year of growth and taking a deeper dive into the community as we plan for the proposed nature center at The Ridge Nature Area.”

About the Southern Conservation Trust

The Southern Conservation Trust protects greenspace, conserves forests, safeguards rivers, protects wildlife, provides environmental education, and ensures that our children have access to nature in our communities.  In 2016, the Trust also opened the premier greenspace project in Fayetteville, The Ridge Nature Area, making it its sixth public nature area in Fayette County. Learn more about how you can partner with the Southern Conservation Trust and protect your land at www.sctlandtrust.org.

Conservation easements are a restriction placed on a piece of property to protect its associated natural resources.  They protect land for future generations while allowing owners to retain many private property rights to live on and use their land, at the same time potentially providing them with tax benefits.  Conservation easements are selective to protect specific conservation values, such as water quality or migration routes, and is individually tailored to meet a landowner’s needs. To learn more about conserving your land please speak with the Southern Conservation Trust www.sctlandtrust.org/conserve

Save the Date: SCT’s Annual Benefit June 8th, 2017

Join us for an incredible evening showcasing local chefs, farmers, and merchants. Al fresco dining, music, and auctions on a beautiful property preserved under a conservation easement. All proceeds benefit the Southern Conservation Trust. Thursday, June 8th 6pm-9pm at Scarbrough Preserve, Rowland Road, Brooks, GA. More information to come shortly.

 

Join the Southern Conservation Trust: Help us make a difference in our community, with Leave No Trace Outdoor Ethics Week.

Leave No Trace Trainer Steph

Join the Southern Conservation Trust

Help us make a difference in our community,

with Leave No Trace Outdoor Ethics Week.

What is Leave No Trace?

The mission of the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics is to protect the outdoors by teaching and inspiring people to enjoy it responsibly, making them an ideal partner for the Southern Conservation Trust. We have multiple opportunities for you to join us in leaving no trace this week!
Leave No Trace in 
Every Park

Wednesday, October 19th 6:00pm at the Fayette County Library – Community Room. Sign up.

Leave No Trace for Homeschoolers

Thursday, October 20th 1:00pm at the Fayette County Library – Community Room. Sign up.

Leave No Trace in our Parks Community Forum

Friday, October 21st 9:00am at the Fayette County Chamber of Commerce. Sign up.

Bike with SCT
Cashe-In/Trash-Out with Leave No Trace

Saturday, October 22nd 9:00am at The Ridge Nature Area Fayetteville – Picnic Area. Sign up.

Mountain Bike with Leave No Trace

Saturday, October 22nd 2:00pm at The Ridge Nature Area Fayetteville – Picnic Area. Sign up.

Hiking with Leave No Trace

Sunday, October 23rd 2:00pm at Line Creek Nature Area Peachtree City – Arena. Sign up.

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